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Journal of Sensors and Sensor Systems An open-access peer-reviewed journal
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A highly sensitive spectral camera for the judgement of cartilage quality, grown in a bioreactor using the methods of tissue engineering, is being developed. It is optimized to detect weak fluorescence signals of different collagen types, elastin and glycosaminoglycans in the spectral region of 380nm to 500nm. Tests with a one- and a two-dimensional version of the system prove that collagen I and II can be detected and discriminated by their different spectral distributions.
Articles | Volume 4, issue 2
J. Sens. Sens. Syst., 4, 289–294, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/jsss-4-289-2015

Special issue: Sensor/IRS2 2015

J. Sens. Sens. Syst., 4, 289–294, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/jsss-4-289-2015

Regular research article 16 Sep 2015

Regular research article | 16 Sep 2015

Development of a highly sensitive spectral camera for cartilage monitoring using fluorescence spectroscopy

A. Kuehn et al.

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Short summary
A highly sensitive spectral camera for the judgement of cartilage quality, grown in a bioreactor using the methods of tissue engineering, is being developed. It is optimized to detect weak fluorescence signals of different collagen types, elastin and glycosaminoglycans in the spectral region of 380nm to 500nm. Tests with a one- and a two-dimensional version of the system prove that collagen I and II can be detected and discriminated by their different spectral distributions.
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