Articles | Volume 5, issue 2
J. Sens. Sens. Syst., 5, 261–271, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/jsss-5-261-2016

Special issue: Dresden Sensor Symposium 2015

J. Sens. Sens. Syst., 5, 261–271, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/jsss-5-261-2016

Regular research article 13 Jul 2016

Regular research article | 13 Jul 2016

Ultrafast imaging Raman spectroscopy of large-area samples without stepwise scanning

Elmar Schmälzlin1, Benito Moralejo1, Daniel Bodenmüller1, Maxim E. Darvin2, Gisela Thiede2, and Martin M. Roth1 Elmar Schmälzlin et al.
  • 1Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), Potsdam, 14482, Germany
  • 2Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology, Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, 10117, Germany

Abstract. Step-by-step, time-consuming scanning of the sample is still the state-of-the-art in imaging Raman spectroscopy. Even for a few 100 image points the measurement time may add up to minutes or hours. A radical decrease in measurement time can be achieved by applying multiplex spectrographs coupled to imaging fiber bundles that are successfully used in astronomy. For optimal use of the scarce and expensive observation time at astronomical observatories, special high-performance spectrograph systems were developed. They are designed for recording thousands of spatially resolved spectra of a two-dimensional image field within one single exposure. Transferring this technology to imaging Raman spectroscopy allows a considerably faster acquisition of chemical maps. Currently, an imaging field of up to 1 cm2 can be investigated. For porcine skin the required measurement time is less than 1 min. For this reason, this technique is of particular interest for medical diagnostics, e.g., the identification of potentially cancerous abnormalities of skin tissue.

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Short summary
Imaging astronomy spectrographs are designed for recording thousands of spatially resolved spectra of a two-dimensional image field within one single exposure. Transferring this technology to imaging Raman spectroscopy allows a considerably faster acquisition of chemical maps. Within the scope of a research project, this method is refined for medical diagnostics, e.g., the identification of potentially cancerous abnormalities of skin tissue.